Friday, August 5, 2011

Greek to me?

In my Greek translations, I recently ran across a number of proverbs. Apparently the textbook likes these proverbs—especially the ones expressing futility. I thought you might enjoy some of them (they are mostly my translation):
 

You are spitting into the sky.

You are devising a small rope out of sand.

You are singing a victory song before the victory.

You are bringing the war engines after the war.

You are shaving the lion.

A big book is a big evil.

A bad egg is of a bad crow.

The roughness of a road tests the usefulness of a donkey.

The wolf changes his hair, not his purpose.

A mob is a poor judge of beautiful things.

Lions at home, foxes in battle.

You are writing on water.

You are seeking milk from a bird.

You are lending light to the sun.


One proverb sounds suspiciously like a mixture of Shakespeare and Julius Caesar: “The world is a stage; life, an entrance—you came, you saw, you went away.” Just remember, though, “without health, life is lifeless.”

3 comments:

Audrey said...

P.S. I'd love to hear if you have a favorite proverb, whether one of these or any other.

Anonymous said...

My favorites:

You are singing a victory song before the victory.


You are bringing the war engines after the war.

You are writing on water.

Without health, life is lifeless

Still trying to figure out the one about spitting into the sky...*looks puzzled*

~Chelise~

Audrey said...

Hi Chelise--it might help you figure out that last one if you think of it as a matter of gravity. Thanks for commenting!

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